Stop NOT Exfoliating Under Your Eyes

There's a new peel that'll freshen up eye-area skin without scrubbing, acids, or serious eyeball injury.
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Marci
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There's a new peel that'll freshen up eye-area skin without scrubbing, acids, or serious eyeball injury.

If I told you the skin under and around your eyes is more delicate than the rest of your face, you probably wouldn't gasp and fall out of your chair. (Though that would be kind of hilarious. Sorry.) Magazines and blogs have been telling you this for years, and that's probably after noticing it yourself.

That's why the directions of every face scrub and exfoliating mask in existence warn you to "avoid eye area." If they meant "don't get this stuff in your eyes," they'd say that, but they say "eye area" because it encompasses the eyeballs and the surrounding area.

Many chemical exfoliators rely on acids that are too potent for the eye area. On the other hand, if you were to use a mechanical exfoliator under your eyes, the little abrasive bits would mercilessly scratch up your thin under-eye skin; not to mention the mere act of scrubbing pulls at the skin, which is basically like saying, "Hey, under-eye bags, please droop more."

But if there were ever a part of your face that could benefit from some exfoliation, it's your eye area. Between fine lines and dark circles and little bumps and a general air of melancholy, it would definitely look a little better without dead-skin buildup--especially since it's trailing behind the frequently exfoliated rest-of-your-face.

WHAT'S A HUMAN BEING TO DO?!

Actually, chemical exfoliation is the answer. But instead of an acid, which can be too irritating, enzymes are the way to go.

Ooooooh, glowyyyyyyy. Photography shot with the Canon SL1.

Ooooooh, glowyyyyyyy. Photography shot with the Canon SL1.

Perricone MD has introduced Blue Plasma Orbital, which sounds like a newly discovered planet, but it's actually a daily peel for the eye area. Its main exfoliating ingredient: the enzymes in salmon roe (that's eggs, or caviar if you're a fancy bitch).

These enzymes are capable of zeroing in on just dead surface skin, exfoliating what needs to be removed and leaving newer cells untouched. That means no irritation! (The aloe in it doesn't hurt, either.)

You don't even have to rinse it off! Just leave it there like an eye cream. In fact, unless you have a really dry eye area, you don't even have to follow up with a separate eye cream. That's because of the hyaluronic acid, allantoin and copper in the formula, which hydrate and condition the skin.

There is a tiny bit of citric acid in Blue Plasma Orbital, but the amount is too insignificant to count as an exfoliating agent. It's probably just hanging out to keep the formula's pH level in check.

I've only just started using it, so I can't confirm if the 95% of folks who Perricone MD says used it for four weeks and reported smoother, brighter under-eye skin are so totally right. But I can tell you that it's not the least bit irritating, and you really can "forget" eye cream.

I kind of want to swim in it, but it's a half-ounce jar, so I don't think that'll work.

I kind of want to swim in it, but it's a half-ounce jar, so I don't think that'll work.

Because of the cool, gelatinous texture, it helps de-puff that slept-on-my-face look. Additionally, it didn't negatively effect my makeup application; there's a touch of dimethicone in the formula, which has a primer-like effect.

So far, I'm definitely impressed and poised to call it a Thing You Didn't Know You Needed. After a few more weeks, I have a feeling I'll be reporting only more good things about it to you guys.