How To Liquefy Coconut Oil For A Portable Moisturizer

Some people just scoop up a small amount, let it melt in their hands and apply it directly to their skin; I prefer to liquefy and transfer the oil to smaller containers to travel with me.
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Malaika
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Some people just scoop up a small amount, let it melt in their hands and apply it directly to their skin; I prefer to liquefy and transfer the oil to smaller containers to travel with me.

I have a problem with ash. Actually, no. Ash loves me. 

Though I’m getting in the habit of following a beauty regimen and being on top of things and being a real adult, every now and then I slip up. And I seem to revel in sharing these slips with the (virtual) world.

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Despite these moments, I actually know what works to keep my dry skin at bay. I’ve discussed my love for my glycerin-water mix. It is the most effective product I’ve ever used to moisturize. With winter, however, you need an extra layer of protection to seal in the moisture. Stubborn fellow, that ash.

To ward off unwanted dryness, coconut oil is the best oil I’ve used. For one, it allows moisture to get into your skin or hair shaft without blocking your pores or strands. Secondly, it’s very light, so it doesn’t create product build-up as easily as other oils. I just apply the coconut oil after I wash and condition my hair or daily after I moisturize my hair or skin.

Pure coconut oil often comes in a solid mass in a jar. You can find it in most natural food or vitamin stores and in some beauty supply stores. Some people just scoop up a small amount, let it melt in their hands and apply it directly to their skin, as coconut oil melts very easily.

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However, I prefer to liquefy and transfer the oil to smaller containers to travel with me. Liquefying coconut oil is simple and comes in handy for on-the-go dry spell touch ups.

First, heat a stainless steel pot, pan, or glass container on medium-low heat. Avoid cast iron because you don’t want other oils mixing up with the coconut oil.

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Next, move the pot/pan to an unheated burner and immediately scoop in the coconut oil. I scooped in about ¾ a cup of coconut oil, which melts to about the size of my 2-ounce finger spray bottle.

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Going, going, gone.

Going, going, gone.

I let the oil cool for only a minute or two before pouring it into my bottle, since I don’t want it to solidify again, and since the oil wasn’t boiling hot, it doesn’t take long to cool. 

When I’m ready to pour, I place the finger spray bottle in a glass bowl so I don’t waste any oil that escapes to the sides.

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Tada! The coconut oil all bottled up, plus a single jazz hand for your pleasure.

Tada! The coconut oil all bottled up, plus a single jazz hand for your pleasure.

You may also want to try different combinations of the oil. When I want it to be heavier for the coldest days, I use a combination of one part olive oil to four parts coconut oil. I’ve also applied a couple drops of essential rosemary oil for every two ounces of coconut oil to stimulate my scalp and make the coconut oil fragrant.

For long travel, like flights or lengthy train rides, I pop the finger spray bottle in the fridge and the oil solidifies quickly. That way I feel more secure that it won’t spill in transit. To liquefy again, just place the bottle under warm water.

*sings* "...solid in a bottle, ya gotta rub me the right way" and cue the Aguilera vocal run.

*sings* "...solid in a bottle, ya gotta rub me the right way" and cue the Aguilera vocal run.

With a combination of glycerin and coconut oil, your skin can stave off dryness even through the harshest cold weather.