Barbie and Aidy Bryant Try Out New Looks

This weekend's beauty news is all about transformations — and it's coming to you straight from a Zorbaz in northern Minnesota.
Avatar:
Kara
Author:
Publish date:
Social count:
97
This weekend's beauty news is all about transformations — and it's coming to you straight from a Zorbaz in northern Minnesota.

I’m writing this weekend’s beauty news from a cabin up north in Minnesota with no TV or internet. I literally have to drive into town to get Wifi access to send this to Marci. That is dedication! 

The fire is roaring and the hot tub is bubbling. I've had at least three cups of coffee. and I just lost a cutthroat game of Monopoly. So this weekend's beauty news might be short, but I promise it’ll be sweet.

OK, let’s do this. I need to go antiquing!

Barbie's body and skin color are finally more inclusive

Barbie has been my ultimate role model since I asked for my first doll at the age of two-and-a-half. (Funny story: when I got my first Ken doll, I was really confused because he didn’t have gray hair like my dad, Kendall.) I was always inspired by Barbie’s life: her many jobs, her pets, her cars, her big, beautiful houses. It was always very clear that those were Barbie’s things, not Ken’s. Barbie worked at McDonald’s, as a vet, as an astronaut. She worked her little butt off for her Dreamhouse, and she wasn’t afraid to try new things. (Another story: I own four pairs of Chanel shoes that belonged to Ruth Adler, the creator of Barbie!)

But I do understand the flak Mattel has gotten for Barbie’s body. She’s very thin and very blonde, and that’s just not the way most women look. While I was able to separate Barbie as a plaything from the real women in my life, that hasn't been the case for everyone — and that’s why it’s really cool that Mattel rolled out a handful of new Barbies in a variety of skin tones and body types (petite, curvy and tall). While they’re not the most comprehensive ever, it’s a start. 

When you invite these new Barbies over to a party with Mattel’s collection from a few months ago that featured women like Ava DuVernay, Zendaya and Eva Chen, it’s a more realistic, inclusive Barbie world.

Check them all out on Barbie's website, which she probably coded and designed herself. 

Pucker up for 100 Years of Lipstick

Lipstick is pretty near and dear to my heart. I love it more than anything. There are 15 lipsticks in my bag right now, and that isn’t abnormal. 

I also love those “100 Years of” beauty videos that seem to go viral every other week. I’ve devoured most of them, though I think “100 Years of Brides” is my favorite. I like pretty dresses, OK? It might be replaced now, though, because makeup artist Kandee Johnson and Allure just dropped “100 Years of Lipstick.”

This video takes us from the decade when just a hint of rouge on the lips was all that was considered appropriate for a lady to now, when we can wear literally any color we desire on our lips. 

Caution: Kid “makeup artists” at work

This week’s beauty news is pretty Allure-heavy, I know, but this was too darn cute not to share. The mag assembled a kiddie glam squad to help Saturday Night Live’s Aidy Bryant (one of my faves) get prettied up for a V-day date with her man. 

“I want to feel everyone’s hands working at one time,” she tells the kids. They’re fluffing blush, smearing eyeshadow and “braiding” her hair while she tells them that makeup doesn’t make you beautiful, but sometimes it helps you feel beautiful.

It’s pretty adorable. Watch the video to see the final result. (Hint: Aidy says “Do you guys know who Divine is?”) I think Aidy’s BF is gonna love her new look.

Hangover beauty is a apparently a trend, but my hot tub/wine hangover begs to differ.

The older I get, the worse my hangovers are. My hands get all swollen, my face is puffy and pale, and I’m usually barfing or lying in the fetal position all day. But apparently this is a sexy look for some? I mean, I guess I've gotten laid a few times with a hangover, so...

A writer at Bustle tried out the “hangover beauty trend,” which stems a Japanese trend from a few years back called “Byojaku face.” It’s a sickly, pale look, and it’s popular because it makes you look girlish and in-distress. OK … stranger trends have happened, I guess.

When attempting to look hungover or sick, you apply blush not to your cheeks, but under your eyes so you look like you’ve been crying. Puffy eyes are desirable, too. Bustle’s writer tries out the whole look, and while it’s not exactly the most wearable, it’s not awful. It's funny — she encounters a whole crew of men during her hangover beauty day and most of them don't even notice, because men never notice your makeup.

  • Have you ever let a little kid do your makeup?
  • How do you feel about Barbie? Do you love her like I do, or do you have mixed feelings about her place in society? What do you think of the new Barbies?
  • What is your hangover beauty look? Do you have one? Or do you roll with your mistakes from the night before?
  • Which era of lipstick is your fave? Which one is most similar to what you do on the daily, and what do you think we'll see in 2020?