Count the Moles on Your Arm as You Pull Back Your Hair With a Hillary Clinton Scrunchie

I swear, that's not a Mad Libs sentence.
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I swear, that's not a Mad Libs sentence.

If your friends are anything like mine, they're all talking about how Gwen Stefani (she of current dip-dye proclivity) looks about as old as someone sending in their college applications in her emotional new video for the song "Used to Love You." She's actually 46, though, so of course, there's plenty of buzz about what she "gets done" to stay looking so youthful.

Having worked at a procedure-centric beauty magazine for many years, I have an educated opinion on what I think might go into Gwen's preservation, but until she voluntarily talks about it, it's just speculation—not news.

The following, however, is news. 

If you have 11 moles on your right arm, you may be at higher risk for skin cancer

It sounds so arbitrary, doesn't it? Almost like an old wives' tale. But according to a new study from London's King College and published in the British Journal of Dermatology, having 11 moles on your right arm could indicate a higher risk of skin cancer.

It's pretty logical, actually. The study showed that subjects with at least 11 moles on their right arms were nine times more likely to have more than 100 moles total, and that's an indication of a higher risk for melanoma development.

Ultimately, it's just a good reminder that we should check our skin regularly and have it looked at by a doctor at least once a year.

"Most moles fortunately don't turn into cancer," Dr. Todd Ridky, a dermatologist who wasn't involved in the study told CBS News. "There are plenty of moley people who never have a cancer, but your risk of developing a melanoma is greater."

Moley people is a medical term, by the way.

Farrah Abraham's six-year-old daughter's makeup is on fleek for her first-grade photo, which is... weird

Farrah Abraham, the Teen Mom teen mom turned 20-something porn star, has been criticized in the past for waxing her then-three-year-old daughter's eyebrows, but she was apparently hungry for more internet anger in the realm of age-appropriate beauty practices. 

Sophia, her now six-year-old daughter, seems to be wearing a significant amount of makeup in the school picture Abraham posted earlier this week.

Instagram and Twitter outrage is intense, with some pretty strong-worded comments about how inappropriate it is to put makeup on a little girl and what kind of message it sends. "All you are doing is clogging up her perfect skin," said one commenter who completely missed the point.

Depending on when Abraham's third breast-augmentation surgery was scheduled, however, she may be too loopy on pain meds to pay attention to the haters.

If your face almost explodes after using at-home hair color, maybe don't do it again EVER

Three years ago, 15-year-old Dinya Rasool of Wales wanted red hair, so she bought some L'Oreal box color to do at home. And, shocking no one because youth, she didn't do the patch test that's supposed to determine a possible allergic reaction. The next morning, she looked like this:

Photo courtesy of The Mirror and your nightmares.

Photo courtesy of The Mirror and your nightmares.

A hospital trip full of antihistamines and steroids got Dinya back to normal, and she learned her lesson.

Just kidding about that second part.

Now that Dinya is 18 and her first ordeal is ancient history, she decided to do another home hair color kit, this time with a Clairol product that doesn't have ammonia, the ingredient Dinya assumed caused the previous reaction. 

She assumed wrong.

Whyyyyyyyyyy

Whyyyyyyyyyy

After another trip to the hospital with the allergic reaction from hell, tests revealed she's allergic to para-phenylenediamine (PPD), an ingredient in a lot of home hair-color kits. 

"Doctors said if I'd left it any longer without treatment, it could've been fatal," Dinya told The Mirror. PPD is banned in much of Europe and now she's hoping it gets banned in the UK, which is understandable. (But seriously, girl, why did you do this a second time?)

You can now show your support for Hillary Clinton with one of her most notorious hair accessories

Hillary Clinton's hair doesn't matter in the grand scheme of Presidential qualifications. I just want to make that perfectly clear. But that doesn't mean it's gone unnoticed. 

The Democratic candidate has had many 'dos over the course of her public figure-dom, and one was wearing ponytails held in place by scrunchies, even though Oscar de la Renta was like, chica, cut your hair.

And now, you can celebrate this questionable period of Clinton's hair life with Hillary Scrunchies

Hillary_Scrunchie_1024x1024.png

"It was a giant f*** you when people tried to riff on her for her appearance," one of the designers told Mashable. "She's called out for whatever she wears and, in 2015, I'm not sure if her criticism of what she wears is even fair. Why not take it back and celebrate her?"

  • Would you wear a Hillary Scrunchie? 
  • Do you patch test when you do at-home hair color? 
  • How many moles do you have on your right arm?