The Single-Plate Flat Iron That Gets The Job Done In One Pass

The Ferrum Styler's single plate design could cut your straightening time in half.
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Danielle
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The Ferrum Styler's single plate design could cut your straightening time in half.

One issue I notice with flat irons is that they sometimes lack the proper grip to smooth a section in one pass, potentially causing damage as you have to pass the iron again and again to get every hair straight. 

New brand Ladies & Gents seeks to solve this problem with a twist on the typical flat iron design: they've created a tool with one ceramic plate and one fabric plate! It's called the Ferrum Styler ($145), and the second I opened it I knew that grip would not be a problem with this iron. 

The bottom plate is velvet, for better to grip you m'dear.

The bottom plate is velvet, for better to grip you m'dear.

Back in beauty school, we were instructed to section hair very precisely, ironing only a quarter-inch section at a time. This method, paired with a heat-proof comb, generally allows you to get each section perfect in one pass, provided you are beginning with smooth, blow-dried hair. (I have a hunch most people aren’t following these steps at home, *wink*.)

Perfectly acceptable air-dried weave waves.

Perfectly acceptable air-dried weave waves.

The single plate design of the Ferrum is a huge help to those who are less than perfect with their ironing. The velvet plate grabs the clamped section and provides the tension needed to straighten even the tightest curls. This is a bit of a game-changer, regardless of your hair texture, since the tension comes in handy in a few situations.

Glossy, smooth flat ironed weave hair. 

Glossy, smooth flat ironed weave hair. 

If you have fine hair, the tension the iron creates will help you get things right the first time, as finer hair lacks a medulla (aka the innermost layer or "marrow" of the hair strand) and is very susceptible to heat damage. The tension also makes it easer to straighten small sections of fine hair; some double-plated irons don't clamp down hard enough to grab a quarter-inch section of fine hair for a single pass. 

And then for those of you with thick hair, the Ferrum will really press and stretch out curls and frizz. In lieu of the second ceramic plate, the fiber side of the iron actually spreads the hair out as it grips, allowing the plate to penetrate every strand and leaving the hair uniformly smooth. 

Irons such as these do more than make hair straight--the Ferrum's grip would make flat iron curls so much easier to execute! Though I have tried more high-tech flat irons, I really like the Ferrum Styler's unique design.  

  • What are some of your pet peeves about flat ironing your hair? 
  • Have any flat ironing tips or techniques to share with the class? 
  • Who curls their hair with a flat iron?